Excited to join the content team at New York Institute of Art and Design!

Fun news! Through a partnership with Movable Media and the New York Institute of Art and Design, I will be regularly writing for NYIAD’s design blog on various topics related to event planning.

The first post went live this week and is called, “How to find out what your event planning client really wants.” Like the content here, our NYIAD content is written for and about the event industry professional and corporate event consumer. (For the bridal style blog, please visit The Portland Wedding Coordinator!)

How to Find Out What Your Event Planning Client Really Wants

I am very excited about this partnership and hope you enjoy the articles too. Feel free to share and comment both here and over at NYIAD. Also, if you have an event planning, event design, or event industry topic you’d like me to cover, please feel free to email me directly at info@ejpevents.com.

–Emee

Blogging for your Event Planner Business


EJP Events is no stranger to event planner blogging – and Special Events magazine noticed that today, asking us to share some thoughts about why an event planner would blog and what’s in it for them as a business.

You can read the entire article, “Event Pros Who Make Blogs Pay Off” at Special Events Magazine’s website. Thanks to editor Lisa Hurley for reaching out to us and quoting us in the article.

Photo credit: Ed Yourdon on Flickr

To automate or not to automate?


(Image thanks to D’Arcy Norman via Flickr.com

With the escalating popularity of social media sites, I hear a lot of advice, especially in the wedding and event biz, about automating your social media feed.
This can consist of pre-scheduling tweets on Twitter, or scheduling blog posts in advance, or linking accounts with ping.fm or other services, so one status update can show across several services, just to name a very few. Many of these services are great timesavers and used wisely, can make the task of social media for business more of a pleasure.
However, I would caution business owners to remember the “social” aspect of social media. Those whose only contribution to Twitter is the RSS feed of their blog, for example, run the risk of looking like they’re only in it for themselves. Especially when said blog is simply a roster of products or services for sale and contains little real advice or education for prospective readers. If you’re wondering why you have few followers, no blog comments, low blog stats, and little interaction, take a hard look at what you’re putting out there and ask yourself, “Is this interesting to the type of people I’d like to interact with, and is it worth a response?”
Whether you choose to automate or not, make sure you keep the social in social media by interacting, reposting/retweeting, and assisting; the same as any good business owner would do in non-online life.